Friday, 10 September 2021

OXO

A photograph of a tablet woven band with white, green and blue diagonal lines and diamonds, draped vertically across a leafy background


Back in April 2019, I shared Noughts and Crosses, a new draft I'd put together, with the intention that it would eventually be part of a trio. The second instalment, Tic Tac Toe, came along in December 2020 and now I'm ready to share the third band, OXO. Each of the bands has motifs in common, but are woven using different numbers of tablets and different colour combinations. With only 18 tablets, OXO would be a great choice if you've never woven something where tablets are turned in two directions at once. Like its siblings, OXO is twist-neutral for the pattern tablets, so you won't get a build up of twist behind them.

With regards to the colour choices, the three drafts together represent my place within the SCA. Tic Tac Toe, in red, gold and black, stands for the Kingdom of Drachenwald (which covers Europe and South Africa). Noughts and Crosses, in blue, gold and black (although in the sample band I used navy blue instead of black, as that's what I had to hand), stands for the Principality of Insulae Draconis (which covers England, Ireland, Iceland, Scotland and Wales). Finally, OXO, in blue, green and white, stands for the Shire of Thamesreach (the Greater London area), which was the local group that got me started.

A tablet weaving draft for 18 tablets, producing diagonal lines and diamonds in green, blue and white.

You can download the TDD file for this draft by clicking here.

The text version of this draft is as follows:

  • Threading:

    1. S threaded tablet
      1. Blue (#0000ff)
      2. Blue (#0000ff)
      3. Blue (#0000ff)
      4. Blue (#0000ff)
    2. Z threaded tablet
      1. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      2. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      3. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      4. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
    3. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    4. Z threaded tablet
      1. Blue (#0000ff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    5. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Blue (#0000ff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
    6. Z threaded tablet
      1. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Blue (#0000ff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    7. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Blue (#0000ff)
    8. Z threaded tablet
      1. Blue (#0000ff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    9. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Blue (#0000ff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
    10. Z threaded tablet
      1. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Blue (#0000ff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    11. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Blue (#0000ff)
    12. Z threaded tablet
      1. Blue (#0000ff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    13. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Blue (#0000ff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
    14. Z threaded tablet
      1. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Blue (#0000ff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    15. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Blue (#0000ff)
    16. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    17. Z threaded tablet
      1. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      2. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      3. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
      4. Japanese Laurel (#009900)
    18. S threaded tablet
      1. Blue (#0000ff)
      2. Blue (#0000ff)
      3. Blue (#0000ff)
      4. Blue (#0000ff)

  • Turning:

    1. 3F 4B 11F
    2. 3F 4B 11F
    3. 3F 4B 11F
    4. 3F 4B 11F
    5. 3F 8B 7F
    6. 3F 8B 7F
    7. 3F 8B 7F
    8. 3F 8B 7F
    9. 7F 8B 3F
    10. 7F 8B 3F
    11. 7F 8B 3F
    12. 7F 8B 3F
    13. 3F 4B 4F 4B 3F
    14. 3F 4B 4F 4B 3F
    15. 3F 4B 4F 4B 3F
    16. 3F 4B 4F 4B 3F
    17. 3F 8B 7F
    18. 3F 8B 7F
    19. 3F 8B 7F
    20. 3F 8B 7F
    21. 7F 8B 3F
    22. 7F 8B 3F
    23. 7F 8B 3F
    24. 7F 8B 3F
    25. 11F 4B 3F
    26. 11F 4B 3F
    27. 11F 4B 3F
    28. 11F 4B 3F
    29. 3F 8B 7F
    30. 3F 8B 7F
    31. 3F 8B 7F
    32. 3F 8B 7F
    33. 3F 4B 11F
    34. 3F 4B 11F
    35. 3F 4B 11F
    36. 3F 4B 11F
    37. 11F 4B 3F
    38. 11F 4B 3F
    39. 11F 4B 3F
    40. 11F 4B 3F
    41. 7F 4B 7F
    42. 7F 4B 7F
    43. 7F 4B 7F
    44. 7F 4B 7F
    45. 3F 4B 11F
    46. 3F 4B 11F
    47. 3F 4B 11F
    48. 3F 4B 11F
    49. 11F 4B 3F
    50. 11F 4B 3F
    51. 11F 4B 3F
    52. 11F 4B 3F
    53. 7F 8B 3F
    54. 7F 8B 3F
    55. 7F 8B 3F
    56. 7F 8B 3F
As with all of the free drafts/ patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Sunday, 18 July 2021

New Link for Tablet Weaving Draft Designer!

If you can't currently access TDD or you're getting a 404 error, it may be because the link to it has changed! 

You can now find it at https://jamespbarrett.github.io/tabletweave/ If you usually use http://bazzalisk.org/tabletweave/ it will now redirect to the new address rather than the old address.

Gecko

A tablet woven band with green edges and a green gecko and foliage motif on a purple background, draped across a hibiscus bush


When I was planning this band, I wanted to play around with some things I don't normally do, namely an asymmetrical animal motif, woven with a light motif line on a dark background, rather than the other way around. I also had some new yarn I was excited to try out.

The yarns I used for this band are from Mothy and the Squid in the colourways Intense Iris and Lime Sorbet, both in her platinum merino/nylon blend sock yarn base. I really enjoyed weaving with this yarn and have plans to use it again in the future. It's really soft to the touch, which made me a little worried, as I've had trouble with soft yarns fraying and falling apart during weaving in the past, but it stood up to the friction of tablet weaving really well. Not a single damaged thread. I suspect this is partly because of the nylon in the blend, partly because of the high twist and number of plies, and partly because it's just a high quality yarn. Another thing that impressed me was that it didn't bleed in the slightest when I soaked it overnight as part of wet finishing. The Intense Iris is so saturated and, well, intense that I was expecting a little bleeding, but there wasn't even a hint. I also have two skeins of the Mothy and the Squid luxury merino/silk/cashmere blend base (which I had to put away in a drawer because I couldn't stop stroking them), but I wouldn't recommend them for tablet weaving. They're softly spun to highlight the fibres and improve the drape and there would be too much friction on them as the threads move past each other. I'm planning to use the two of them for a colour work knitted cowl some time in the future.

I have cut the Gecko draft into two pieces, as it's pretty big. Apart from the selvedge tablets, it's twist-neutral (each tablet performs the an equal number of forward and backward turns), so you won't get a build up of twist behind the pattern tablets.

Part one of a tablet weaving draft with green threads at the edges and a gecko motif in green threads against a background of purple threads

Part two of a tablet weaving draft with green threads at the edges and a gecko motif in green threads against a background of purple threads

You can download the TDD file for Gecko by clicking here.

You can download the text description for Gecko by clicking here.

As with all of the free drafts on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Wednesday, 7 July 2021

New Video!

 I've made a new video about the steps I use to set up for a new band.



Saturday, 3 July 2021

New Video!

I'm weaving a vacant-hole band at the moment and I've made a video about how I stop the tablets from rearranging themselves when they have one or more vacant holes. If you're having trouble weaving Petre from elsewhere on my blog, this should hopefully help.



Branches

A photo of a green and white tablet woven band patterned with leaves and branches, taken against a leafy background

Sometimes people ask how I come up with my ideas. It varies quite a bit, depending on the project I'm working on. For my books Warp-Twined Angles and Vacant-Hole Pinwheels, when I was coming up with their large number of motifs, I worked out some of them by just playing around with a pencil and some draft paper and some of those lead on to others (what happens if I put this line here instead?). Further motifs came about when I was inputting the motifs into Tablet Weaving Draft Designer when I was inspired by the shapes the lines took on above where I was working.

The idea for this particular draft came to me when my mind was wandering during a Very Large Headache. I'd been thinking about coming up with a branching leaves type motif for a while. Sometimes I have an idea of the type of motif I want to weave, then my brain works away at it until it's ready to draw as a pencil sketch. This can be pretty unhelpful if the draft comes together in my head while I'm attempting to fall asleep!

I made a video of how I generated the draft for this band using TDD that you can view below.



A tablet weaving draft for a band in white and green, with a branching, leafy motif
You'll get a build up of twist behind some of the tablets for this draft, so you could tackle it using fishing swivels or combing it out manually, as I did. If you'd prefer to weave it out (working a version of the draft with turning directions opposite to what you've previously done), I've put together a reverse draft. Before you begin it, make sure that you've completely finish the last repetition of the draft above and that all the tablets are in the A-D position.

A draft for the reversed version of the Branches draft, with green leaves and branches on a white background pointing down instead of up

You can download the Branches TDD draft by clicking here.

You can download the text version of the Branches draft by clicking here.

You can download the Branches reverse TDD draft by clicking here.

You can download the text version of the Branches reverse draft by clicking here.

As with all of the free drafts on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Tuesday, 22 June 2021

New Video!

 


I have a new video up on my YouTube channel. In it I show you how I flip a tablet to change its threading direction.

Monday, 7 June 2021

Birka Band B22

A photograph of several lengths of red and yellow tablet woven band, patterned with floral motifs and lattice work, against a leafy backdrop

When I was a beginner, all the way back in 2006, the very first band I tried to weave was based on one of the finds from a Viking cemetery in Birka, Sweden, dated to the 8th to 10th century. It's a lovely draft, but for me it was a tale of disaster from start to finish. I made pretty much every mistake there is and very nearly gave up on the whole thing. Several days later, I warped eight tablets for a simple four turns forward, four turns backward band and the rest is history. I'm not saying that you shouldn't try it as a beginner, but it would be helpful to have some muscle memory for turning the tablets before you tackle it.

I've been thinking about the draft again recently, as it turns up on Instagram pretty often, and I thought it would be fun to go back to the original source and take a look at the find that it's based on. Historiska Museet, Sweden, have kindly made many of the reports about the Birka digs available online as free pdf downloads. The textile finds are covered in Birka III - Die Textilfunde Aus den Grabern[1], with chapter VII "Bänder: Ein broschiertes Band — ein echtes Gewebe" (from page 75 onwards) discussing the tablet woven bands. The reports are in German, but copying and pasting sections into Google translate will produce something somewhat comprehensible.

The Carolyn Priest-Dorman draft[2] is based on a section from band B22, a label that Geijer uses for several similar finds, from graves 731, 750 and 824. The fragments from graves 731 and 750 were poorly preserved, but showed use of both gold and silver brocade wefts, like the better preserved example from grave 824 (detailed notes for the three bands are given on page 88 of Birka III - Die Textilfunde Aus den Grabern). Geijer describes the B22 band from grave 824 as having been woven with at least 29 tablets, with borders that needed a probable 6 tablets on each side (only the threads from 4 tablets on each side actually survive). The tablets were all threaded in the same direction and there were no turning reversals visible on the back of the band. She theorises that as the back of the band appears roughly woven and is rather unattractive, the band would originally have been sewn onto another fabric, leaving only the brocaded side visible. The band itself is 1.2cm wide and 9.5cm long and has around 20-25 brocade wefts per cm, with the gold weft at a greater density that the silver weft, perhaps because the gold was softer and easier to beat into place than the silver.


Black and white photographs of several sections of a brocaded tablet woven band from the Viking cemetery at Birka in Sweden

Several photographs of the B22 band (edited to remove a photo of a different band from the bottom right corner). Image from Geijer (1938) Birka III - Die Textilfunde Aus den Grabern, Plate 23

Diagrams of the original brocade motifs of the B22 bands, depicted using a series of small vertical lines on a pale peach background

A schematic diagram of the motifs from the B22 band. Image from Geijer (1938) Birka III - Die Textilfunde Aus den Grabern Figure 20, page 83. I believe that the smaller section at the bottom is what Carolyn Priest-Dorman based her draft on. I chose to base my draft on the longer of the two sections

I freely admit that I don't enjoy weaving brocade, so I converted the motifs into 3x1 diagonals instead when I designed my version of the B22 find. I chose a yellow background colour to mimic the areas of the original that were covered by the gold brocade weft and "stave" borders for the selvedges, which are a fairly common feature of such bands[3]. I used red as my motif line and weft colour, as I liked the contrast between it and the yellow and the little spots of the red weft that show through in the large yellow sections mimic the brocade weft tie-down points of the original. I also chose to weave it in King Cole Merino Blend 4-ply (in mustard and scarlet) instead of the silk[4] of the original, as that was what I had to hand in the colours I wanted. This means that my band is 4.3cm wide, rather than the original 1.2cm.

I have designed the band to be twist-neutral for the pattern tablets (you will get a build-up of twist behind the four selvedge tablets on each side of the draft), so the pattern repeat is pretty long to incorporate a lattice section that twines in the opposite direction. I've split the draft itself into two pieces to make them easier to work from, in such a way that you can weave from just one of them without breaking the motifs, if you prefer. You can view them at their full size by clicking on the draft to select it, then right-clicking on it and selecting "open image in new tab", click on it one more time in the new tab and it should be much bigger.

A draft for weaving a red and yellow tablet woven band, patterned with floral motifs and lattice work

A draft for weaving a red and yellow tablet woven band, patterned with floral motifs and lattice work

You can download the TDD file for this draft by clicking here.

As the turning diagram for this draft is over 200 picks long, I've chosen not to include the text description in this post. Instead, you can download it by clicking here.

References

[1] Geijer, Agnes (1938). Birka III - Die Textilfunde Aus den Grabern. Birka: Untersuchungen und Studien III. Uppsala: Almkvist and Wiksells B.A., Kungl. Vitterhets Antikvitets Akadamien. Retrieved from: https://historiska.se/digitala-resurser/filer/pdf/Birka_III.pdf (17/05/2021)

[2] Priest-Dorman, C. (1993). Viking-Style Tablet Weaving: Birka Strapwork Motif, Retrieved from: https://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/birkarcp.html (17/05/2021)

[3] Spies, N. (2000). Ecclesiastical Pomp and Aristocratic Circumstance: A Thousand Years Of Brocaded Tabletwoven Bands, Arelate Studio

[4] Ostrom Peters, C. (2002). The Silk Road Textiles at Birka: An Examination of the Tabletwoven Bands, The Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings, Retrieved from:  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1407&context=tsaconf (17/05/2021)


Sunday, 6 June 2021

New Video!

 I have a new video up on YouTube. It's all about how I use TDD to generate narrow drafts from tablet weaving. I'll be sharing the draft on my blog for free, just as soon as I finish the sample band.



Friday, 4 June 2021

The New Warp-Twined Angles is Ready!

I'm really excited to share the new Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Warp-Twined Angles books with you!

Over the past three months, I've been working on a new (old?) project and it's ready to share! In fact, it went live in the Blurb online book shop on the 1st of June.

Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Warp-Twined Angles Volume One
The 42 drafts from the first edition of Warp-Twined Angles, reformatted to make them easier to use, with all new samples and photography.


Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Warp-Twined Angles Volume Two
65 new drafts in the same style as the first edition, published separately for people who have the first edition and just want the new drafts.


Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Warp-Twined Angles Combined Edition
All 107 drafts collected together in a single volume. There's no material in the Combined Edition that doesn't also appear in the separate volumes and vice versa.

Tuesday, 11 May 2021

My Design Process for Large Drafts



At the beginning of the year, I was working through a set of designs for a sample band and I thought you might like to see the way I use Tablet Weaving Draft Designer during my design process. For large drafts like this one I work a bit differently to the way I do for smaller drafts, as I find that otherwise I get lost in them (thanks, dyslexia!). To reduce the amount of visual noise, I focus on the pattern of backward turns against forward turns rather than the colour and direction of the threads. For smaller drafts like the ones in my two books Warp-Twined Angles and Vacant-Hole Pinwheels, I turn the backward turn saturation to zero and work with the flow of the threads in the boxes instead. 

I wove these drafts as 2x2 diagonals, but I designed them in 1x3 diagonals, as the turning sequence will be the same and it results in a pencil sketch that's easier for me to read.

Step 1

Draw out the motif. I use metric graph paper as my standard "thinking paper" as I can fit quite a few designs on the same sheet.

A spiral motif formed from intersecting diagonal lines, drawn in pencil on graph paper

Step 2

Draw 4x4 zigzags around the motif and draw in all the vertical and horizontal mirror lines. 

A spiral motif formed from intersecting diagonal lines, drawn in pencil on graph paper with horizontal and vertical mirror lines drawn in and surrounded by 4x4 boxes

Step 3

Shade in all the areas that contain left leaning lines (these will be the backward turns in the final draft).

A spiral motif formed from intersecting diagonal lines, drawn in pencil on graph paper, with the areas containing left slanting lines shaded in

Step 4

Draw a simplified schematic of the shaded motif, where each square in the schematic is equivalent to a 4x4 square in the motif. Add vertical and horizontal mirror lines down the middle of the schematic.

A spiral motif formed from intersecting diagonal lines, drawn in pencil on graph paper, with the backwards turns shaded in, next to a smaller schematic of the draft

Step 5

Turn off the threads in the display section of the control panel of TDD and set the rulers to the same position as the mirror lines in the schematic. Open the previous draft from the batch and alter the dark and light squares to match the new schematic. I also reduce the visual scale until I can see the whole draft on my screen at once. The 4x4 squares at each corner of the draft will produce the filler between the motifs.

A photo of a laptop with a browser window showing a Tablet Weaving Draft Designer draft with shaded boxes

Step 6

Turn the threads back on, the rulers off, and the backward turn saturation down to zero and check that the motif looks the same as the pencil sketch motif.

A photo of a laptop screen showing Tablet Weaving Draft Designer draft in purple and yellow, with the threads turned on and the backward turn saturation set to zero

Step 7

The final draft with both the threads and backward turn shading in place, ready to weave. I do this straight from TDD without printing anything out, as I can use the horizontal ruler tool to help me keep my place.

A completed Tablet Weaving Draft Designer draft in yellow and purple with intersecting diagonal lines

Step 8

Weave the draft! 


A photo of a tablet woven band with the motif woven in yellow and purple with intersecting diagonal lines


For this band I used yellow onion dyed yarn and purple/almost black logwood dyed yarn from the stash I've been dyeing for over the last few years. I'm hoping to play with some indigo this summer to get purples from my red brazilwood yarn and greens from my yellow weld and onion skin yarns.

Friday, 7 May 2021

Exciting Book News!

Since the beginning of March, I've been working on a new project or maybe I should say that I've been working on an old project? 

At the back of my first book, Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Warp-Twined Angles, I wrote that when I designed the drafts for the book, there were more that didn't make it in, as there wasn't enough warp to weave all of them. I hadn't originally intended to turn them into a book (I designed them as a way to keep myself from going stir-crazy when I couldn't weave for a month due to an elbow injury), so I wasn't planning for it when I wove them. I wrote that I hoped to revisit them at some point in the future and maybe add some more drafts to the list.

This spring, I picked the project back up, initially intending to add a few extra drafts and update the photography, layouts, samples and explanations to create a revised edition of Warp-Twined Angles. Well, one thing lead to another and the number of drafts grew to over 100 in total; enough for a second volume in its own right. I had a lot of fun coming back to this project and I really enjoyed weaving something so completely different to the double-face drafts I spent much of 2019 and 2020 working on for my book Double-Face Inscriptions.

The new Warp-Twined Angles will be in three different editions:

Volume One, which will have the 42 drafts from the first edition
Volume Two, which will have the additional 65 new drafts (with notes on the historical examples that some of them are based on)
A Combined Edition with the full 107 drafts together.

They will be in hardback, softback, ebook, and pdf and will be available to buy in June (if everything goes to plan) from Blurb.com.

Tablet woven bands in black and white with orange edges, decorated with geometric motifs, arranged diagonally across the frame


Wednesday, 7 April 2021

Petre

This draft is based on a German brick-stitch pattern from the Hildesheim Cope (accession number: 17-1873), specifically the section that deals with the martyring of Saint Peter (spelled "Petre" in Latin). I've been fascinated by the Cope since I first saw it in the summer of 2016, on display in Medieval and Renaissance Room 9 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. It's a large embroidered semi-circular vestment, dated to the 12th century, adorned by a number of tablet woven brocaded bands. I discuss the motifs of these bands in more detail in my book Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Vacant-Hole Pinwheels.

A white vacant-hole tablet woven band with red diamond and diagonal line motifs, photographed against a green leafy background

I decided to design this draft as vacant-hole (one or more holes of the tablets are left intentionally empty), but to set up the tablet threading so that all the tablets would turn together in the same direction to make a quick and simple weave. This makes it an excellent first band if you've never tried the technique before. 

When I was weaving the sample, I flipped the threading direction of the selvedge tablets (tablets 1, 2, 3, 36, 37 and 38) so that I could turn them together with the pattern tablets. When you flip a tablet, then turn it in the opposite direction, its threads will continue to twine in the same way as before. A Z-threaded turned backwards will produce the same result as an S-threaded tablet turned forwards.

If you take a break during weaving this draft, be sure to secure the tablets with an elastic band or by tying a cord around them (or what ever method you prefer) as they may re-orient themselves so that the vacant-hole is either at the top or bottom of the pack.

A diagram representing a square weaving tablet with a hole in each corner, carrying a white thread in two of it's holes and a purple thread in another. The purple thread is diagonally opposite from a vacant hole and the tablet is oriented so that the vacant hole sits at the top.

The vacant holes of the tablets are represented by empty squares in the draft below and by the word "Empty" in the text version of the draft. The sample was woven using a white weft, flecks of which can be seen on the surface of the band, where they would normally have been covered if the vacant holes of the tablets were filled. If you'd prefer, the draft's turning sequence will be the same if the vacant holes of the tablets are filled. If you do this, I suggest picking a thread that is the same as your background colour and using a weft that's the same colour as the lines for your motifs.

A tablet weaving draft patterned with white and red threads forming diamond and diagonal line motifs.

You can download the TDD file for this draft by clicking here.

The text version of this draft is as follows:

  • Threading:

    1. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    2. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    3. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    4. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    5. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    6. Z threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    7. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    8. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    9. S threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    10. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    11. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    12. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    13. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    14. Z threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    15. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    16. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    17. S threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    18. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    19. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    20. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    21. S threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    22. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    23. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    24. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    25. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    26. Z threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    27. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    28. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    29. S threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    30. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    31. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    32. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Empty
      4. White (#ffffff)
    33. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Empty
    34. Z threaded tablet
      1. Empty
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    35. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Empty
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    36. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    37. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    38. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)

  • Turning:

    1. 38F
    2. 38F
    3. 38F
    4. 38F
    5. 3F 32B 3F
    6. 3F 32B 3F
    7. 3F 32B 3F
    8. 3F 32B 3F
    9. 38F
    10. 38F
    11. 38F
    12. 38F
    13. 3F 32B 3F
    14. 3F 32B 3F
    15. 3F 32B 3F
    16. 3F 32B 3F
    17. 3F 32B 3F
    18. 3F 32B 3F
    19. 3F 32B 3F
    20. 3F 32B 3F
    21. 38F
    22. 38F
    23. 38F
    24. 38F
    25. 3F 32B 3F
    26. 3F 32B 3F
    27. 3F 32B 3F
    28. 3F 32B 3F
    29. 38F
    30. 38F
    31. 38F
    32. 38F
As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Friday, 2 April 2021

Threading Errors Video

 


In this video, I talk about some of things that can go wrong with tablet weaving and the threading errors that cause them.

Friday, 26 March 2021

Knitting Patterns

As part of tidying up my account ahead of Ravelry becoming even less accessible, I'm moving the small collection of knitting patterns that I designed to here.

Aesculus Shawl 

A knitted heart-shaped shawl with lace motifs based on the horse chestnut tree.
Pattern download
Charts download

Hugs by Post Shawl

A simple textured knitted heart-shaped shawl.

Lace Draw-String Bag

An easy knitted lace pouch.

Needle Roll

A quick to knit holder for your knitting needles.

Sunday, 21 March 2021

Yarns I Like for Tablet Weaving


Recently, I wrote about and made a video about the criteria I use when I'm selecting yarn for tablet weaving. In this post, I thought I'd tell you about some of the yarn that I like using myself. I'm not sponsored by any of the companies I mention and everything I say here is my personal opinion.

When I weave rigid heddle and tablet woven bands for the sale box I take to events with me (in non-plague years!), I mostly use Drops Karisma DK. It's 100% wool, 100m/50g and comes in a good range of colours. It's also pretty economical, especially if you buy it during one of the Drops discount events that happen several times a year.

A photo of a small wooden chest filled with bundles of tablet woven and rigid heddle bands in a variety of colours

I like to use King Cole Merino Blend 4-ply when I'm weaving trim. It's 100% superwash wool (meaning that it's machine washable)and 180m/50g. It's the yarn I used when I wove the samples for Noughts and Crosses and Tic Tac Toe and makes a lovely trim, as it makes bands that weave up fairly fast, but are less bulky when stitched to a garment than DK.

A photo of a blue, dark blue and yellow tablet woven band interlaced with a red, black and yellow tablet woven band

For the samples I make for my books, I like World of Wool Weaving Yarns, although at the time of writing, it's out of stock on their website. I really hope that they're able to get more of it, as it stands up to tablet weaving really well. It's 100% wool and 8000m/1000g and comes in black, white and orange. To extend the range of colours, I've been using the white yarn for natural dyeing. For one of the samples for my book Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Double-Face Inscriptions, I used Brazilwood dye and an alum mordant from George Weil to get the lovely red colour that I needed.

A photo of a piece of blue fabric on which sits a white tablet woven band with red lettering that reads "Psalmorum codex Anno domini Millesimo cccc lvij" or "Book of psalms 1457"

Lastly, Piper's Silks. For very special bands, I use their 80/3 spun silk, which is 75m per spool. It's beautifully smooth and because of its tight twist, it stands up to tablet weaving really well. It's pretty fine, so when I use it to make a belt, I laminate together several layers of buckram, then sandwich that between the band and cotton twill tape and stitch them together. This yarn comes in a great range of vibrant colours and the woman who runs the company is an absolute pleasure to work with.

A photo of the waist and legs of a person wearing a grey wool dress with red sleeves and a black, red and white tablet woven belt patterned with flower motifs and brass fittings

Saturday, 13 March 2021

Choosing Yarn for Tablet Weaving

I've made a new video and added it to the beginning of the tutorial page here. It's all about the things I consider when choosing yarn for a new band.



Saturday, 27 February 2021

Correcting Errors Video!

I found that I really enjoyed making a video about using TDD last week, so I thought I'd make another! This time it's about the technique I use for stripping out weft when I want to reweave a large section of a band. I've added it to the top of the page I've made for it here on my blog, too.

I have several more videos I'm planning to make and I hope to sort out a set up at some point so that you can actually see me weave. There's a semi-continuous warping technique that I've been wanting to share with you for a long time.



Friday, 26 February 2021

Correcting Errors


If you are unhappy with your band or you want to correct a mistake, you can turn the tablets in the opposite direction to the way you turned them during weaving to unweave your work, taking the weft out of the shed as you go. If you need to go back more than a few picks, you might want to consider stripping out the weft to make this process easier.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band with the letters W and X in black on a white background


In this example, I was testing out some of the letter drafts that would one day be part of my book Tablet Weaving in Theory and Practice: Double-Face Inscriptions. I decided that my majuscule (capital) X looked far too much like someone with antennae running for a bus. Rather than continuing, I stripped out the weft so that I could re-use that section of warp and try out another version of the letter instead.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band with the warp threads pulled to either side and the weft exposed


Pull the warp threads apart to the side, towards the selvedges to expose the weft.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band with the cut ends of the exposed weft sticking out

Snip it with a pair of scissors (being very careful not to nick any warps!) to a point a few picks above where you want to restart your band.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band with the weft removed for part of it

Pull out each piece of weft with your fingers or a pair of tweezers.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band with the weft removed and the twist between the tablets and the band removed

Turn the tablets until the twist is gone between them and the final piece of weft in the shed just above where you plan to restart.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band ready to weave the next section of the draft


Unweave the final few picks by turning the tablets in the opposite direction to the way you turned them when you wove that section. Carefully remove the weft from the shed each time it is exposed and the shed is open. This will give you a short section of weft attached to the band.


A photo of a section of tablet woven band with the letters W and a new X in black on a white background

Join a new weft by placing it into the shed with a short tail sticking out of the band, then turn the tablets according to your draft and place the old weft tail through the shed alongside the new weft to lock it in place. Weave with the new weft and the old weft tail in the shed together for a pick or two, then continue on with only the new weft. Trim away the tails of the new and old wefts to neaten up the band.


Sunday, 21 February 2021

Tablet Weaving Draft Designer Updates

 We've been wearing our bug squishing boots again! 

This weekend we've:

  • Fixed an error that caused the horizontal ruler to sit behind the threading diagram, rather than on top of it
  • Sorted a few spelling errors
  • Updated the copyright notice to read 2015-2021
  • Changed the instructions link to point to a new version
  • Fixed a bug causing canvas size change problems when the rulers would be off the edge of a new draft
There's also now a video on YouTube about using TDD.

Tablet Weaving Draft Designer Is on Youtube!


Monday, 15 February 2021

Getting the Most from Tablet Weaving Draft Designer


As some readers may already know, Tablet Weaving Draft Designer (TDD for short) is a free, browser-based tablet weaving drafting tool, which you can also use offline if you already have it loaded on your device. It's a joint project by my husband, James, and I that we started back in 2015 as a way for me to draft out my tablet weaving ideas more easily. It's changed quite a bit in the intervening years, most significantly over the Christmas holidays of 2020, when James did a full rewrite of the code and we implemented some new features. 

As part of the rewrite, the draft that TDD generates is now an SVG (scalable vector graphic) image meaning that you can highlight any of the numbers and letters on it with your cursor, should you so desire. We also added new collapsible menus for the Control Panel, as it was getting pretty big and cluttered. In this article, I will walk you through the different tools of TDD and what they do.

A four-hole tablet, labelled clockwise A to D starting in the top right corner


Before we get started, I want to define a few of the terms and assumptions that TDD uses. Tablets are labelled clockwise from A onwards (as shown above) and the drafts use a tablet starting position with A and whatever the letter of the final label is (this will vary based on the number of holes the tablet has) at the top. For four-holed tablets, it will generate a draft with quarter (90 degree) turns in the threading diagram; for two-holed tablets, it will generate a draft with half (180 degree) turns etc.

A diagram showing the different part of a TDD draft and what they represent

TDD displays both the threading direction of the tablets, as used by Peter Collingwood (the way the threads pass through the tablet), as the letters S and Z at the bottom of the threading diagram and warp alignment (the way the tablets appear on the warp when viewed from above) as the slant of the ovals within the threading diagram (threading direction and warp alignment are covered in more detail here). Click on the S or Z beneath the column for a tablet to change its threading direction/warp alignment. This will automatically update the turning diagram to match. To change the turning direction for a particular tablet in the turning diagram, click on the square you want to change and it will automatically change all the squares above that point too.

The TDD Control Panel has nine sections, but you don't have to use all of them to create your draft if you don't want to; the bare minimum you need is the Controls section at the top and the Palette section further down. Click on the name of each section or the plus symbol next to the name to expand that section of the Control Panel. Click on the name or the minus symbol next to the name to collapse it again.
The TDD Control Panel with every section expanded

Draft Name

Type the name of your draft in the empty box at the top of the Control Panel. This will be the name used for any files or images you save or export. If you leave this empty, TDD will use the file name "draft" instead.

Controls

Enter the number of picks (rows) you want the turning diagram to have, the number of holes the tablets will have and the number of tablets you want, using a keyboard to fill in the boxes or with the plus and minus buttons on either side of the boxes. You can always change these values later if you need to. TDD will add any extra picks to the top of the turning diagram and any extra tablets to the right of the threading diagram.

Rulers

TDD comes equipped with horizontal and vertical rulers, the position of which can be controlled by entering a value in the text box or by using the plus and minus buttons. The horizontal ruler is particularly helpful if you weave from your computer screen, as you can advance it up the page to help you keep track of your position in the turning diagram. I like to use the vertical ruler to mark the centre of the draft if it is a really wide one with a line of symmetry down the middle. You can also use the vertical ruler to mark the next tablet you need to thread in the threading diagram when you warp your loom. You can enter a minus number for the horizontal ruler position to make it appear in the threading diagram rather than the turning diagram. If you would prefer not to use the rulers, you can remove them by clicking to un-tick their boxes. I always do this before exporting the draft as an image file. 

Display

You can un-tick the Show Threads box to remove the thread ovals from the threading diagram. This is helpful if there's an error in your turning diagram that you can't pin down, as it lets you see the pattern of forward and backward turns more easily.

Tick the Show Threading Diagram box to include the threading diagram at the bottom of your draft. If you're generating a large number of drafts that all use the same threading, leaving it out after the first draft will save you some space on your page.

If you prefer to mark the points in the turning diagram where the turning direction of a tablet changes, rather than which tablets are turning backward or forward, tick the Show Reversals box to add a red line to the draft at these points.

The Show Text Description box will produce a set of written instructions equivalent to your draft, which will appear below it. The threading diagram is described tablet by tablet, with hexadecimal codes and names (more information about these names is given below) for each of the thread colours, with a list of turning instructions broken into groups of tablets below it. The description below is the text version of the example draft above:

  • Threading:

    1. Z threaded tablet
      1. Yellow (#ffff00)
      2. Flirt (#990099)
      3. Yellow (#ffff00)
      4. Flirt (#990099)
    2. Z threaded tablet
      1. Flirt (#990099)
      2. Yellow (#ffff00)
      3. Flirt (#990099)
      4. Yellow (#ffff00)
    3. S threaded tablet
      1. Flirt (#990099)
      2. Yellow (#ffff00)
      3. Flirt (#990099)
      4. Yellow (#ffff00)
    4. S threaded tablet
      1. Yellow (#ffff00)
      2. Flirt (#990099)
      3. Yellow (#ffff00)
      4. Flirt (#990099)

  • Turning:

    1. 4F
    2. 4F
    3. 4B
    4. 4B
    5. 4F
    6. 4F
    7. 4B
    8. 4B

The Backwards Turn Saturation slider can be used to increase or decrease the level of contrast of the grey background squares on the turning diagram. If you slide it all the way to the left, you can make the background of all the squares white instead to get a quick preview of what the draft might look like when woven.

When I'm creating a draft for weaving double-face, I un-tick the Show Threads tool and set the Backwards Turn Saturation to about 75%, as I'm using the draft to show the placement of the background colour and contrast colour rather than what the individual tablets are doing, but I still want to be able to see the borders of the boxes on the turning diagram. This charting method is also useful in producing drafts for brocaded bands.

A simple draft with squares filled with either grey or white
A simple draft for either brocade or double-face

Since the big December re-build, the Visual Scale of the draft can now be used to both increase the size of the draft on your screen and decrease it (if you input a negative number into the box), which is really helpful for getting an overview of very large drafts.

Repeats

We initially took out this tool during the update, as we weren't happy with the way it was functioning. Now that it's back, it works a bit differently, but it's now no longer possible to use it to generate a band mock-up that won't work when woven.

Select the Show Repeats box and TDD will add a mock-up of your band to the right of your draft; it will look the the same as your draft, but all the squares will have white backgrounds and it will be missing any red lines or rulers. Specify which picks you want to be included in your mock-up using the Repeat Start and Repeat End fields and TDD will show you what a band would look like if you repeated that turning sequence using the threading diagram you have input. You can change how many times TDD repeats those picks using the Number of Repeats field. More information about how the Repeats tool works can be found here.

Resets

Treat the Reset All button with caution! It clears everything away and resets your draft to 1 pick high and 1 4-holed tablet wide at 0 Visual Scale. It's really helpful if you want to start a new draft from scratch, but there's no undo function, so always save your work before using it.

The Clear Pattern button will reset your turning diagram to the default, with every square set to forward turn, with no turning reversals, but won't change your threading diagram or the number of picks in it.

Palette

To change the colours of your threads, click the Foreground Colour you want, then click on the thread you want to change in the threading diagram. If you want that tablet hole to be empty so you can produce a vacant-hole draft, select "None" from the left side of the Palette before clicking on the threading diagram. This will give you an empty box instead of a thread for that tablet hole on the threading and turning diagrams. The numbers underneath the colours in the Palette tell you how many times that colour is used in the threading diagram to make warping for your band easier.

The Palette will display a Colour Name for the colour you have selected, taken from an open source java-script library by Chirag Mehta. This colour name is also used in the Text Description below the draft, if you have it turned on.

If the colours in the Palette aren't to your preference, you can adjust them by selecting a colour's box and changing it using the Red Green Blue sliders below it. Alternatively, you can enter the RGB values for the shade you want next to the sliders. If the colour you have changed is used in your draft, the draft will be automatically updated with your changes.

Export

TDD can export images for both your draft and for your pattern repeat mock-up. Fill in the number of pixels wide you want the image to be in the box, then click on any of the three buttons below it to download your image. If, for example, you want your image to be 5cm (2 inches) wide with a resolution of 250dpi, enter 500px in the Export Width box.. TDD can export your draft as an .svg file, a .jpeg file or a .png file. The file name will be the same as the name you gave the draft at the top of the Control Panel. The image will be the same as your draft, so if you have the rulers or red reversal points turned on, they will be included in your exported image.

Files

One of the big behind-the-scenes changes that we made this past December is the way TDD saves files. Previously, it used the .json format which produced a large amount of coded information, the vast majority of which would be gibberish to the lay-person. The new .tdd files are much shorter and actually resemble your draft if you open one up in a text editor (like Notepad++, Sublime Text, Emacs, Vi, Atom, or any programmers' editor); if you do open one, make sure that you don't accidentally change the file extension or TDD won't be able to open it again. 

You will still be able to open any of the .json files you previously made using TDD, but you will only be able to save in the new format. We don't intend to remove this capability to open old files, so there's no rush to convert them.

When you click the Save button, TDD will download the .tdd file for your draft to your device using the draft name you specified at the top of the Control Panel, in the same way as the Image Export tool. Clicking the Choose File button will open an Open File dialogue box. The text below is the contents of the save file for the example draft above.

//\\
//\\
\\//
\\//
//\\
//\\
\\//
\\//

7997
9779
7997
9779
ZZSS

0 - #ffffff
1 - #000000
2 - #ff0000
3 - #009900
4 - #0000ff
5 - #dddddd
6 - #999999
7 - #ffff00
8 - #00ffff
9 - #990099
a - #ff8800
b - #ff8888

We will be continuing to add to TDD's features over time to support a wider range of drafting styles and I'll publish information about any changes on my blog as we make them. If you have any suggestions for new features, you can leave them at my blog or on Github, where you can also view TDD's code, but keep in mind that TDD is a project that we work on in our spare time, so it may take a while for them to be implemented. I hope this tutorial has been instructive and inspires you in creating your own drafts. 

Sunday, 14 February 2021

Tablet Weaving Draft Designer Update: Exporting an Image of Your Pattern Repeats

At the request of a user, you can now use TDD to export and image of your pattern repeat mock-up as well as of your draft. You can find the tool for this in the Control Panel under Export, below the buttons for exporting an image of your draft. It gives you the option to download it as an .svg, a .jpg or as .png file.

Monday, 11 January 2021

S and Z

I designed and wove this band all the way back in the summer of 2019, so I think it's definitely about time I shared it with you. It was inspired by the prevalence of S and Z motifs in medieval Europe and is woven in 3x1 diagonals.

It's an easy weave, with tablets in groups of four turning backward or forward for groups of four turns and is a great one to try if you want to practice working with multiple turning directions at the same time. It's twist neutral for the pattern tablets, so you'll only get a build up of twist behind the two selvedge tablets carrying the white yarn on either side of the pattern.

You can download the TDD file for this draft by clicking here.

A tablet weaving draft in red and white with S and Z motifs

A photo of a red and white tablet woven band with S and Z motifs


The text version of this draft is as follows:

  • Threading:

    1. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    2. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    3. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    4. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    5. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    6. Z threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    7. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    8. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    9. S threaded tablet
      1. Red (#ff0000)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    10. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. Red (#ff0000)
      3. Red (#ff0000)
      4. Red (#ff0000)
    11. S threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)
    12. Z threaded tablet
      1. White (#ffffff)
      2. White (#ffffff)
      3. White (#ffffff)
      4. White (#ffffff)

  • Turning:

    1. 2F 8B 2F
    2. 2F 8B 2F
    3. 2F 8B 2F
    4. 2F 8B 2F
    5. 12F
    6. 12F
    7. 12F
    8. 12F
    9. 12F
    10. 12F
    11. 12F
    12. 12F
    13. 2F 4B 6F
    14. 2F 4B 6F
    15. 2F 4B 6F
    16. 2F 4B 6F
    17. 2F 8B 2F
    18. 2F 8B 2F
    19. 2F 8B 2F
    20. 2F 8B 2F
    21. 2F 8B 2F
    22. 2F 8B 2F
    23. 2F 8B 2F
    24. 2F 8B 2F
    25. 12F
    26. 12F
    27. 12F
    28. 12F
    29. 2F 8B 2F
    30. 2F 8B 2F
    31. 2F 8B 2F
    32. 2F 8B 2F
    33. 12F
    34. 12F
    35. 12F
    36. 12F
    37. 12F
    38. 12F
    39. 12F
    40. 12F
    41. 6F 4B 2F
    42. 6F 4B 2F
    43. 6F 4B 2F
    44. 6F 4B 2F
    45. 2F 8B 2F
    46. 2F 8B 2F
    47. 2F 8B 2F
    48. 2F 8B 2F
    49. 2F 8B 2F
    50. 2F 8B 2F
    51. 2F 8B 2F
    52. 2F 8B 2F
    53. 12F
    54. 12F
    55. 12F
    56. 12F

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.