Sunday, 29 December 2019

Tablet Weaving Draft Designer Updates

This update was inspired by Github user @jenniferalons, who came up with the idea for and wrote the code needed to add a function to TDD that would show several repeats of the draft making it easier to visualise what a band will look like, without having to do it manually within the draft. The pattern repeats will appear on the screen to the right of drafts or below them if there isn't enough space.

We've added to this great idea by making it possible to turn pattern repeats on and off, to specify how many repeats and to allow the user to decide how much of the draft to repeat (there are some patterns where a few set up picks are needed before the pattern can start). We've also made it so that you can save pattern repeats as well as drafts as picture files.

An example draft with its pattern repeat to the right of it

Thank you @jenniferalons!

Sunday, 18 August 2019

Sharp

This pattern was inspired by work done by Shelagh Lewins on a band from the Oseberg ship burial (buried in 834 CE). It's a simple threaded-in pattern and is woven by turning the tablets continuously forwards (or by turning the tablets continuously backwards to work out built up twist). It's reversible, so the pattern appears on both sides of the band and would make a great selvedge pattern as part of a larger band.

This is an easy weave, as the tablet threadings produce the pattern so there's no need to make turning direction changes or keep count of numbers of turns. A perfect pattern to work on if you're new to tablet weaving.

A simple tablet weaving pattern in blue and yellow

A photograph of a blue and yellow tablet woven band made using the pattern above

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Oseberg Roses

This pattern was inspired by work done by Shelagh Lewins on a band from the Oseberg ship burial (buried in 834 CE). It's a simple threaded-in pattern and is woven by turning the tablets continuously forwards (or by turning the tablets continuously backwards to work out built up twist). It would make a great selvedge pattern as part of a larger band.

This is an easy weave, as the tablet threadings produce the pattern so there's no need to make turning direction changes or keep count of numbers of turns. A perfect pattern to work on if you're new to tablet weaving.

A simple tablet weaving pattern in white, red, green and yellow

A photograph of a tablet woven band made using the pattern above

Very Long Ship

This pattern was inspired by work done by Shelagh Lewins on a band from the Oseberg ship burial (buried in 834 CE). It's a simple threaded-in pattern and is woven by turning the tablets continuously forwards (or by turning the tablets continuously backwards to work out built up twist). It's reversible, so the pattern appears on both sides of the band and would make a great selvedge pattern as part of a larger band.

This is an easy weave, as the tablet threadings produce the pattern so there's no need to make turning direction changes or keep count of numbers of turns. A perfect pattern to work on if you're new to tablet weaving.

When I was photographing the sample band, I decided that one way up it looked like a bobsled team with many members and the other way up it looks like a very long longship with oars trailing into the water.

A simple tablet weaving pattern in red and yellow


A photograph of a tablet woven band made using the pattern above

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Ferns

This pattern was inspired by work done by Shelagh Lewins on a band from the Oseberg ship burial (buried in 834 CE). It's a simple threaded-in pattern and is woven by turning the tablets continuously forwards (or by turning the tablets continuously backwards to work out built up twist). It's reversible, so the pattern appears on both sides of the band and would make a great selvedge pattern as part of a larger band.

This is an easy weave, as the tablet threadings produce the pattern so there's no need to make turning direction changes or keep count of numbers of turns. A perfect pattern to work on if you're new to tablet weaving.

A simple tablet weaving pattern in blue and white

Two example tablet woven bands made using the pattern above

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Meander

This pattern was inspired by work done by Shelagh Lewins on a band from the Oseberg ship burial (buried in 834 CE). It's a simple threaded-in pattern and is woven by turning the tablets continuously forwards (or by turning the tablets continuously backwards to work out built up twist). It's reversible, so the pattern appears on both sides of the band and would make a great selvedge pattern as part of a larger band.

This is an easy weave, as the tablet threadings produce the pattern so there's no need to make turning direction changes or keep count of numbers of turns. A perfect pattern to work on if you're new to tablet weaving.

Because most of the tablets in this band are threaded the same way, it will spiral back on itself when not under tension. You can counteract this by soaking it for at least an hour in cold water, then letting it air dry and pressing it with a steam iron (according to the ironing instructions for the yarn that you used). This gives some of the twist energy stored in the fibres of the band a chance to dissipate and will let the band lie flatter.

A simple tablet weaving pattern in blue and red

A photograph of a tablet woven band made using the pattern above

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Wandering Path

This pattern was inspired by work done by Shelagh Lewins on a band from the Oseberg ship burial (buried in 834 CE). It's a simple threaded-in pattern and is woven by turning the tablets continuously forwards (or by turning the tablets continuously backwards to work out built up twist). It's reversible, so the pattern appears on both sides of the band and would make a great selvedge pattern as part of a larger band.

My thanks to the Ravelry Tablet Weaving group who helped me to name this one.

This is an easy weave, as the tablet threadings produce the pattern so there's no need to make turning direction changes or keep count of numbers of turns. A perfect pattern to work on if you're new to tablet weaving.

A simple tablet weaving pattern in pink and grey

A photograph of a tablet woven band made using the pattern above

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Tuesday, 4 June 2019

Tablet Weaving Draft Designer Updates

If you look in the Control Panel on the left side of the TDD window, you will find two shiny new controls! We've added a horizontal ruler and a vertical ruler to help you to keep your place in the draft (especially, if like me, you weave from a computer screen without printing the draft out). You can change the position of the rulers using the plus and minus controls. Un-tick the ruler boxes in the Display section if you would prefer not to use the rulers in your draft.

Saturday, 27 April 2019

Noughts and Crosses

A photograph of a tablet woven band in black blue and yellow made using the pattern below


If you've read my work, you'll know that I really enjoy designing warp-twining bands in the Scandinavian style, with many non-repeating motifs. Lately, I wanted something a little simpler, but still in the same style, so I came up with this one and I thought it would be fun to share it. Apart from the six selvedge tablets, it's twist neutral, so you won't get any build up of twist behind the pattern tablets. I've been flipping the selvedge tablets after every two repetitions of the draft. I wove it in King Cole Merino Blend 4-ply as it has a good range of colours and has the bonus of being superwash. The band is 5cm wide.


A tablet weaving pattern in blue, black and yellow

As with all of the free patterns on this site, you are welcome to weave them, sell bands woven using them, and use them to teach other weavers, just as long as you state where you found them.

Saturday, 9 March 2019

Tablet Weaving Draft Designer Updates

We've made some hopefully useful changes to TDD today.


Firstly, bug fixes:

The notice at the bottom of the drafts has been corrected so that the web address only has one http in it.

A typo in a line of code that was resetting the palette to defaults when the page was refreshed has been corrected (our thanks to Mark, who spotted it).

The instructions page now includes a note about using TDD for vacant-hole patterns.


Secondly, interface additions:

You can now choose how dark you want the grey backwards turn squares using a slider in the display section of the control panel. This should hopefully make TDD more useful for people who would prefer a greater level of contrast between the backgrounds of the two types of squares (our thanks to kjax, who inspired this addition during a Ravelry private message exchange).

The display section now also gives you the option to add a red horizontal line to the draft at the turning reversal points. I know many weavers prefer to mark this point as they weave by flipping tablets that need to change twining direction, rather than turning backwards or forwards.


Finally:

The code for TDD is now available on Github at https://github.com/jamesba/tabletweave